The Frog Bride. a shame.

    Click HERE for the link for the Narrative: Text to follow.                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

A poem about being caged by ideas, that Soul is something that is caged by the idea that is frog-like, wet, and yucky. Not nice to hold, actually causes us to shudder.  A frog is able to live on land and in the water to live deep in the undercurrents of emotion. Frogs like Bears can hibernate for long periods be completely dried out and come back to life, which of course a saving grace for us after we have dried out our Soul to suit the status quo. 

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings

The free bird leaps
on the back of the wind
and floats downstream
till the current ends
and dips his wings
in the orange sun rays
and dares to claim the sky.

But a bird that stalks
down his narrow cage
can seldom see through
his bars of rage
his wings are clipped and
his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings
with fearful trill
of the things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill for the caged bird
sings of freedom

The free bird thinks of another breeze
and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees
and the fat worms waiting on a dawn-bright lawn
and he names the sky his own.

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
his wings are clipped and his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing

The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.

 

THE NIGHT WE MISSED THE WEDDING  by Robert Bly

 

When I recite a line I allow the voice to drop off,

I speak strongly as I climb the line, and then, leave the last word

to trail down, so that, no one can hear it.

Doubt enters then, just when there should be something fierce,

when the throat should come in, some of what it knows what it feels,

what it wants,

Why shouldn’t the voice ……. spread it’s peacock tail

In which the eyes …… of the universe ….. are open

This hiding is the shamed boy who hides in his room at night

And does not ….. get up….. and go ….. to the wedding.

How hard it is to believe your bride is beautiful

How hard it is to love your bride for this night and for always

She baked bread for you, and the wedding shirt,

Then …. speak ….. to     HER

 

The doorway of death.

In the Lakota-Sioux tradition, a person who is grieving is considered most wakan, most holy. There’s a sense that when someone is struck by the sudden lightning of loss, he or she stands on the threshold of the spirit world. The prayers of those who grieve are considered especially strong, and it is proper to ask them for their help.

You might recall what it’s like to be with someone who has grieved deeply. The person has no layer of protection, nothing left to defend. The mystery is looking out through that person’s eyes. For the time being, he or she has accepted the reality of loss and has stopped clinging to the past or grasping at the future. In otherwords the groundless

Grieving and redemption.

“We’ve got a cultural narrative that says bad things happen in order to help you grow, and no matter how bleak it seems, the end result is always worth the struggle. You’ll get there, if only you believe. That happy ending is going to be glorious.

“Grieving people are met with impatience precisely because they are failing the cultural storyline of overcoming adversity. If you don’t “transform,” if you don’t find something beautiful inside this, you’ve failed.”  And if you don’t do it quickly, following that narrative arc from incident to transformation within our collective attention span, you’re not living the right story.

There’s a gag order on telling the truth, in real life, and in our fictional accounts. As a culture, we don’t want to hear that there are things that can’t be fixed. As a culture, we don’t want to hear that there is some pain that never gets redeemed. Some things we learn to live with, and that’s not the same as everything working out in the end. No matter how many rainbows and butterflies you stick into the narrative, some stories just don’t work out.” – It’s OK That You’re Not OK 

 

 

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